Links, Links and some more links

March 26, 2007

A peripheral glance at this blog should convince the reader that I enjoy reading more than writing. I write very sporadically (I do realise how cruel it is to the blog-readers ..). But, those who frequent here often will hopefully realise a kind of “silent blogging” happening as I update my links to the left.

For example, I’ve created new lists as new Maths blogs came along and my lists were updated when geology/chemistry blogsphere grew to its present size. I call this “silent blogging” for a very good reason. One, I am trying via these links to attract the attention of my readers to these blogs which is very similar to what a lot of posts in blogsphere end up doing. Secondly, the list of links to the left is my way of conveying my tastes – to tell those who visit this blog what sort of stuff I find interesting. In that sense, this list is a form of self-commentary, a way of communicating my perspectives.

A substantial part of what people are is what they find interesting. On that vein, I’ve included a link to my Google Reader(Shared Items) page (Feed URL) . It’s mostly a list of posts from all over the physics blogsphere. Occasionally, you might find a non-physics post, but, I will try to stick to physics posts for now.

As a compensation, here is a list of non-physics links which I found interesting.

1) Here are some great photos of the institute from which I got my undergraduate degree. It shows a lot of buildings as they were under construction. To my colleagues from there who are reading this, how many of these venues can you identify ?

2) Via one of my schoolmates, I came to know of this blog by Kalyan Verma. He seems to be a great lover of wildlife photography and has some interesting photos up on his blog.

3) Terence tao has an interesting post about the Navier Stokes equation – Why Global Regularity for Navier Stoke is Hard ? (By the way, I should probably sit down and write a post on whatever little I’ve learnt about Ricci flow and Perelman’s proof on Poincare’s conjecture – but, unfortunately, it is a bit too much effort to put together all my notes…)

4) See also his post about mathematical education – there is an interesting discussion in the comment section about math-literacy and its significance in the present world.

5) Recently, a lot has been written about the E8 story. Rather than flex my fragile representation-theoretic muscle, I will ask the readers to read an exposition by John Baez .

6) Also read the recent “This week’s finds in Mathematical Physics” dealing with quasicrystalline tiling and Islamic architecture apart from E8.

7) Carl Zimmer has an interesting post titled Said the Mouse to the Other Mouse, “Dude, You Would Not Believe The Colors I’m Seeing….” based on this paper in Nature. By changing a gene, biologists have made Mouse see colours that it normally cannot see ! Though Zimmer quiet doesn’t come around to talking about it, I was reminded of Ramachandran’s discussion (on what is known as “Qualia” in philosophy) in his book “Phantoms in the Brain”.

8 ) Talking of Ramachandran, if you haven’t read/heard it already you should definitely have a look at Reith lectures by Vilayanur S.Ramachandran titled “The Emerging Mind”.

P.S. : Recently, I was tagged by the “Entertaining Research” Blog asking me to link this post by the “Effect measure” blog in which they have resolved to explain a technical paper on “a mathematical model to investigate the spread of antiviral resistance in the control of pandemic influenza”. In their own words

Why consider this an “experiment”? The experiment was to see if a paper that used a coupled system of non-linear ordinary differential equations as its main technical tool could be explained sufficiently so a lay audience could understand what was involved and how the model worked. In that way they would have a better appreciation for the findings and some understanding of an important tool, mathematical modeling. We took it as a personal challenge…

As somebody who can almost never sit down to patiently explain in writing the interesting things in science, I have nothing but great admiration for this effort spanning some sixteen posts on a single paper !

3 Responses to “Links, Links and some more links”

  1. Guru Says:

    Dear Nayagam,

    Thanks for the link. Not just sixteen posts, there are soome sidebars too — like this one about thinking mathematically.

  2. Kohli Says:

    Hey Tom,

    whatsup ?! nice blog..reading it though will give my seriously lightweight brain a major headache🙂..

    tk care..

  3. nayagam Says:

    Hi Kohli,
    Sorry for replying so late. I am fine as ever. Writing about science without giving people headaches is apparently an art I am yet to master…


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